Category Archives: 2006 Show

James Wright | seating


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Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

James Wright

“What games shall we play?”

 


Thomas Quan | seating


Published :    By : Deborah      Cat :    Comments : 0

Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Thomas Quan

“But I always say, one’s company, two’s a crowd and three’s a party,” quoting Warhol.


Ryan Leggasicke | seating


Published :    By : Deborah      Cat :    Comments : 0

Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Ryan Leggasicke

“Shhhh. Listen, I have an idea. If you do not turn any pages, we will never get to the end of this book.”


Paul Campbell | seating


Published :    By : Deborah      Cat :    Comments : 0

Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Paul Campbell

transparency and the desire for rest
dreams and sliding meaning
quotations and the distant love affair


Joel Robson | seating


Published :    By : Deborah      Cat :    Comments : 0

Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Joel Robson

A dialogue can develop when two seemingly disparate things occupy the same space. In this case two furniture pieces have a conversation between themselves about their histories. Part gossip, part respect. Is it the beginnings of a community?

 


Ryan McLay | seating


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Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Ryan McLay

“Come sit down and let’s trade some cards!”

 


Studio Exit | seating


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Each year at CUTMR the hallways have naturally created space for people to connect with each other and reflect on what they have seen. This theme in mind, each artist was asked the same question: If your seating project for CUTMR could talk, what would it say?

Studio Exit

I sat, she sat, we sat, and sat, and sat, and our legs grew thick and heavy. And our toes dove deep into the earth, we wiggled them around in all direction, and our toes dove deeper into the earth where it was wet and rich. And our legs grew thick and heavy until we stood up to leave but we could not pull our toes from the ground. We raised our arms to wave for help – we waved and waved into the air. And our fingers grew longer in all directions twisting in the spring air until we could wave no more. We called for help but made no sound, we were thick and heavy and silent. And men came to save us; they took us away and arranged us in most peculiar fashions. Still we could not move, we were placed and again we sat, and sat and sat.


Jenny Francis & Lisa Mann | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Jenny Francis & Lisa Mann

We have designed a chandelier composed of frozen bound latex glove sculptures that capture light in subtly shifting transparencies as they thaw and refreeze. The light comes from the south during the day and from a simple overhead bulb at night; we thought of the chandelier as a collection of lenses that is transformed by light, and its heat.


Orest Tataryn | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Orest Tataryn

I would like to say that it’s an intellectual or philosophical questioning of artificial lighting’s relationships to evolving socialization. But it’s not that. More than anything else, the attraction lies in the direction of the moth fascinated by the flame: a rather child-like glee in being able to manipulate my environment with colour and shadow, a joy in being able to create fantasy with the turn of the toggle. There is not enough magic in our lives and a little too much explanation.

 


Missile Design | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Missile Design

The effect of light through a diffuser can be as profound as it is unpredictable. Much has yet to be explored while technology keeps the medium fresh and push-able.

 


Megan Whiten | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Megan Whiten

I wanted to give my work a luminescence, to create a floating, ethereal, sea creature feel. And the lighting enhances the embroidered text. In this case, lighting was more of a practical element, as opposed to something I’m drawn to.

 


Dennis Lin | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Dennis Lin

I work in lighting to create an environment, a mood. Lighting is one of the strongest ways to create an environment. This piece really relies on the end user, the viewer, to ask questions. The lighting helps create a more reflective space.

 


Lisa Neighbour | lighting


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Each lighting artist was asked the same question: Why are you drawn to light and lighting?

Lisa Neighbour

I’m so glad you asked that question, it is one I have asked myself more than a few times. 1. I’m afraid of the dark. 2. I can’t see in the dark. 3. I find myself in darkness more and more often. 4. I like the way light emphasizes and defines the shadow world. 5. I notice lights before anything else. 6. My first memories are all about light. 7. I like electricity. 8. I love junk. 9. I like rehabilitating things that are dead and broken. 10. I enjoy creating experiences and spectacles. So if you have any dead lamps, parts, etc. You know where to bring ’em. Also, if you need a lamp fixed, I do that for fun, and for free.

 


Motherbrand | Room 214


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BIO

Motherbrand seeks out opportunities to collaborate with Canadian creatives from a wide range of disciplines. Our projects bring together these unique talents and perspectives to find inspiration in our distinct ‘local’ culture.

Our best-known project, Cabin introduced new works by more that twenty or Canada’s brightest designers. Drawing from the best of the cabin experience, both real and imagined, the familiar objects of the cabin were transformed for the everyday. Cabin has been shown in Tokyo, New York, Toronto, Edmonton and Calgary. Selected works have been included in exhibits and the permanent collections of the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum, NYC.

In addition to the Cabin exhibit, Motherbrand’s activities range from publishing (Hypergraphia Magazine), scenario planning (Milano Explorer), design education (Across the Lines workshop) and presenting numerous lectures on design and ideas.

STATEMENT

We have chosen to launch our latest project here at CUTMR because we feel that the cross-disciplinary nature of this event reflects our own collaborative approach and vision.


Melanie Zanker & Kelly Palmer | Room 213


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BIO

Kelly Palmer and Melanie Zanker are two artists from different disciplines who use their mediums to explore design.

Palmer’s career as a theatrical scenic painter has influenced her work as an artist. She paints Canadian landscapes that are engaged with mobile structures exploring and interacting within the spaces.

Zanker’s artistic endeavours have shaped a multi-disciplinary practice, which incorporates her skills as a woodworker, seamstress and furniture designer.

STATEMENT

Palmer and Zanker will present a collaborative exploration into the spatial dynamics of landscape and furniture. Their focus is to recycle, integrate and re-design objects that have been discarded in order to create interactive Hybrid objects.


Relish | Room 212


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BIO

Relish Design is the studio division of Relish, directed by Paul Mezei, a practitioner, educator and writer who works collaboratively with a network of designers, makers and experts in all fields. Relish design thanks University of Toronto School of Architecture, Landscape, and Design for it s support of this work.

STATEMENT

Interdisciplinary design studio Relish design will debut its new line of flower vases (Flowerblobs) at CUTMR 2006. These glass and ceramic vessels have been produced using a hybrid of digital and hand-crafted techniques. They are installed in a cellular space of the Gladstone Hotel to reveal an “evolutionary” process in the development of these products. Stages that are typically hidden; all the failures, dead ends, mutations, imperfections, penultimate and random successes are presented alongside the definitive selections.


Terence Cooke | Room 211


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BIO

Terence Cooke is a Toronto-based industrial designer with a degree in Industrial Design from the University of Alberta. Since his graduation in 2003 Cooke had been featured on House & Home Television as one of Canada’s up-and-coming designers, and had had work featured in publications Azure. Canadian Interiors, and The Globe and Mail. Cooke’s work debuted at the Pure Canadian showcase at the Totem Gallery during ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) in 2003.

STATEMENT

The Gladstone Hotel’s Come Up To My Room is the only venue in Toronto where the line between art and design is not only blurred but dissolved entirely.


Bruno Billio & Miriam Grenville | Room 209


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BIO

Miriam Grenville worked in the residential design industry for 15 years before starting her own design company in 2004. She works with illustration as well as digital images and process to create alternative wall coverings that are guaranteed to “raise eyebrows and start discussions”. She has showcased her work at IDS and been featured on HGTV.

Bruno Billio is a visual artist in residence at the Gladstone Hotel. Billio is fascinated by the architecture of spaces and objects. He transforms everyday objects, re-purposing them and even redefines the scale and position of objects. He is known for his stacked sculptures of furniture, found objects and string installations. Often Bruno utilizes his own living space and personal possessions to infuse his work with familiarity and history.

STATEMENT

The invitation to collaborate with another artist at CUTMR came at just the right time. This is our first collaboration. We’d like to thank the curators for pairing us. We welcome the opportunity to combine our talents and to meet another group of Canadian artist-designers.


Tiff Izsa | Room 206


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BIO

Tiff Izsa is an emerging installation artist based in Düsseldorf, Germany and Toronto, Canada. Izsa graduated from the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2003 and later studied for 2 more years at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in Germany. Since Izsa’a first exhibition in 2001 her work has been exhibited extensively throughout the Toronto art scene, including yearly exhibitions at Katherine Mulherin Contemporary Art Projects. Izsa has received numerous awards for her installation work, and curatorial endeavours including the first “Best Emerging Artist” title in 2004 by the newly formed Toronto Arts Awards.

STATEMENT

I use a subtle form of subversive parody in my work to develop concepts about ideas in and of art i.its integration into the pedestrian landscape and the process and motivations involved in its creation. I explore and develop ideas as themes through the use of scrupulous mimesis. With this exhibition I will address and highlight the contradiction inherent in the use of contemporary visual art as home decoration by creating a full-scale installation based on popular interior design practices.

 


Kathryn Walter, FELT | Room 205


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BIO

FELT is a design company based on the material and ideas of felt.

Founded by artist Kathryn Walter, the company specializes in industrial manufactured felts and is unique in its commitment to a material rather that a market, allowing it to move into numerous fields including visual art, architecture and design.

The versatility of the material is evident in the product lines FELT Home, FELT Fashion and FELT Gift, while FELT Custom and FELT Design/Build demonstrate a further range of possibility for fabrication. Clients have included Holt-Renfrew, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the Power Plant: Contemporary Art Gallery at Harbourfront, Bruce Mau Design, Canadian Rocky Mountain Resorts and Teeple Architects.

The company emphasizes eco-friendly living. All felts are 80 – 100% wool with varying combinations of virgin and recycled fibres. FELT products are designed using basic geometric patterns that enable low-waste production.

FELT(TM) is a trademark of FELT, the company.

STATEMENT

While I support Toronto’s Interior Design Show I welcome CUTMR with its idea of offering a parallel alternative to this more commercial event. I come to the world of design with a visual art background – while I’m interested in exploring the functionality of materials I also choose to look critically at modes of production. For CUTMR I plan to push the relationship between form and function to an extreme in a playful honest look at minimalism and sustainable design.


MADE | Room 204


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BIO

MADE is Shaun Moore, Julie Nicholson and Andresa Sisson; all based in Toronto. They invent playful concepts to bring you pleasure. Their varied backgrounds in furniture, textile, digital, printmaking and curatorial work allow for an atypical approach to design. MADE was born of cohabitation without procreation. The long-time friends, now living apart, maintain the fun and exuberance of their time together through collaborative projects.

STATEMENT

MADE has chosen to Come Up To My Room because the Gladstone Hotel is a hotbed of creative projects and deliquent ideas. This opportunity allows the showcasing of MADE ideals. Besides, it’s not every day you get to play in somebody else’s room.

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE

In conjunction with the MADE installation, Shannon Cochrane and Thom Sevalrud have collaborated to present a performance-based artwork title MADE Service. Shannon, a performance artists, and Thom, a visual artist/illustrator, are known for a previous tour of spectacles under the moniker Winter Performance.


VEST Collective | Room 203


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BIO

VEST Collective was founded in 2005 by a group of not so like-minded individuals bound by a passion for craft and design. Our mandate focuses on cross collaborations, innovative use of materials/spaces, and conceptually driven design. It is our intention to promote Canadian design on both a national and international level.

STATEMENT

Our participation at the Gladstone’s Come Up To My Room event allows us to fully explore a more conceptually driven approach. We are a newly formed collective poised to make an impact on the Toronto design community.


Rob Southcott | Room 202


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BIO

Rob is proud to live in Toronto, where he was first introduced to the arts and where he developed his own ideas studying at the Ontario College of Art & Design. A 2004 grad, Rob has since been expanding his ideas, creating works of simple natural beauty that come together through the manipulation of materials and techniques forming the objects of his imagination. Rob likes to reflect on his own works as functional sculpture guided by emotion and fuelled by fantasy.

STATEMENT

I appreciate the platform that CUTMR produces for artists and designers. A different approach that the static environment produced at most North American Design and Trade Shows. Here’s an opportunity to showcase new ideas in an intimate setting and construct an experience where design lies within.


Joy Walker | Room 201


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BIO

Joy Walker is a Toronto artist originally from Montreal, Quebec. She trained at the Ontario College of Art & Design and completed a 3-year artist residency at the Textile Studio at Harbourfront Centre, Toronto. Joy also owns and operates WORK Textiles (since 1995), producing custom silkscreen printed fabrics. Her fabrics have been sold in retails stores throughout Canada and the U.S. And have been featured in numerous newspapers and periodicals. Her textile work is held in several public collections, and she has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards. Joy has also collaborated with furniture designer Andrew Jones to create one of the Gladstone’s artist-designed guest rooms. Joy is currently teaching in the Textile Department at Sheridan College.

STATEMENT

I’m interested in that moment where art meets function. Hotel rooms have fascinated me as the perfect place to explore this moment: they are relentlessly practical, functional spaces that, nevertheless, provide an opportunity for an art installation to insinuate itself and engage a captive audience.