Tag Archives: Toronto Design



Interview with artist Xiaojing Yan


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Xiaojing Yan, 'Past and Present'

Artist Xiaojing Yan shares how her immigration from the East and West, specifically China and North America, influences her practice, and how she weaves her experiences of change and complexity through her work.

How do you see your CUTMR installation/project fitting in to your larger practice as an artist, architect or designer?

After living in Canada and the United States for several years, I have become increasingly interested in cultural and personal identity and in the need to discover a new mode of artistic and social expression that blends Chinese and Western ways of thinking. In an effort to shape myself, I take traditional Chinese materials and techniques and reinvent them within a Western aesthetic and presentation. CUTMR provides me with a unique opportunity to show my artwork to the diverse public to search for echoes.

How do you see your practice expanding over the next five years?

Moving from China to Canada has been the most significant change in my life. For me, this experience engendered a “new life”, from which I draw strength and richness. Making art is not only meaningful to me but has sustained me. As an immigrant in North America, I know that the adaptation of these two cultures will be a life-long journey. With art, I will continue solidify my experiential and complex reactions to this challenge.

Why do you think about the rise and interest in multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary practices?

Interdisciplinary finds a new approach for artists by encouraging and inviting us to expand our horizons and thought processes beyond singular disciplines. This also has opened up countless opportunities for art to expand into the new spaces that are created from the interaction of different disciplines. Art is a meaning-making process. As artists who are going to translate our deeply felt knowledge into art, we must keep our minds alive and continually expand our capacities.




Interview with LeuWebb Projects


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LeuWebb 'weather balloon'

Christine Leu and Alan Webb offer their candid responses to the CUTMR 2011 participant interview …

1. How do you see your CUTMR installation/project fitting in to your larger practice as an artist, architect or designer?

An installation such as the one we’re doing for the show allows us to explore some fields of interest that may not come up in the course of our other work. Installations also present an opportunity for us to quickly play with and test ideas whereas a building project in architecture can take many years to come to fruition.

2. How do you see your practice expanding over the next five years?

Given our modest successes thus far (and provided we stay on each others good sides!), we plan on doing more installation work together. We’re interested to see how we can take our design approach and apply it to a variety of different circumstances and sites to create potentially widely differing results.

3. If this is a first time collaboration, I’m interested to know what bought you together and how you see yourself going forward. (Or is this more of a one-time deal, and if so, why?)

While this is one of our first projects together, we’re both interested in creating meaningful spatial experiences for people and share a similar design vocabulary of using simple and readily available materials.

4. Why do you think about the rise and interest in multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary practices?

It’s a great direction for design and research. In our case, we’re both architects with a wide range of interests and we’re getting assistance from friends Jeff Lee (a scientist in biology) and Omar Khan (a computer programmer) to devise the reactive lighting system for our installation. Working side by side with people in different disciplines is fun and can provide an instructive enrichment to the work.

5. CUTMR has really expanded from a design show to be a fertile exhibition for all kinds of artists, designers and creative people. Help us come up with a new name for the kinds of makers that participate in CUTMR.

ROOMIES!


Interview with Kira and Ed of Studio 1:1


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Studio 1:1, DeSpaced concept image

Using only 149 words, here are Studio 1:1’s responses to the CUTMR participant interview questionnaire:

How do you see your CUTMR installation/project fitting in to your larger practice as an artist, architect or designer?

Come Up To My Room is not merely an event where a lot of emerging young people get to have their breakthroughs. It is first if a all a learning ground where artists get to learn a lot, fast and, most importantly, from ones own mistakes. For us CUTMR is a huge opportunity but it is also a classroom.

How do you see your practice expanding over the next five years?

Fast and wide. In our installation practice we would like to focus on issues of technology and space by creating interactive installations at numerous venues and fairs.

What do you think about the rise and interest in multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary practices?

It is inevitable in the society of vast technological resources. Our minds are expending and are able to fit more and more information. The individual curiosity is what guides the need to explore diverse interests.

CUTMR has really expanded from a design show to be a fertile exhibition for all kinds of artists, designers and creative people. Help us come up with a new name for the kinds of makers that participate in CUTMR.

Partist – an individual who’s creation stems from using a variety of parts either through disassembling a greater object or using parts not for their intended uses.